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Dandelion leaf

buy dandelion leaf

Fol Taraxacum officinale Weber.

Family: Compositae
Description: See Dandelion root
Habitat: See Dandelion root.
Harvest: Leaves picked in spring or early summer, (Mill, 1993); before flowering, (Bradley, 1992).

Dosage: 1:5 Tincture: 4-8ml tds, Fluid Extract: 1-4ml tds, Dried: 4-10g tds.

Actions:
-DIURETIC,
-CHOLERETIC, (Bradley, 1992);

Organ systems: URINARY;

Indications:
-Urinary disorders; fluid retention, (Bradley, 1992), especially with heart problems, (Ody, 1993), or post-menopause (AD);
-Insufficient production of bile;
-Cholecystitis; gallstones, (Bradley, 1992);
-High blood pressure;
-Detoxification [influences secretion of bile, aids body to expel uric acid], (AD);

Safety: Safe;
Contra-indications: Occlusion of bile ducts, (Bradley, 1992).

Key Constituents (Bradley, 1992):
-Sesquiterpene lactones;
-Triterpenes;
-Phenolic acids;
-Coumarins;
-Carotenoids, such as lutein;
-[Polysaccharides, (Wren, 1988) and AD];
-Minerals, especially potassium (3.5-4.5% in dried leaf) and iron;
-Vitamins A (14000 iu/100g in fresh leaf), B, C and D.

Pharmacology: Polysaccharides and aqueous extracts have anti-tumour activity in animals, (Wren, 1988). Diuretic and saluretic indices of fluid extract greater than those of root and comparative to ‘frusemide’ [primary orthodox diuretic]. High K in herb replaced that eliminated in urine. (Bradley, 1992)

History: French pissenlit no doubt derives from herb’s diuretic action. Can be made into beer, for recipe see Smith, 1977:67, and young leaves also tasty and nutritious addition to salads.

Traditional and Practitioner sources:
“It wonderfully openeth the uritorie parts, causing abundance of urine, not only in children…that water their beds, but in those of old age also upon yeelding small quantitie of urine.” John Parkinson, (Mills, 1993).

“The infusion of the leaves makes a cleansing remedy for toxic conditions including gout and eczema. Also use as a gentle liver and digestive stimulant. Make with freshly dried leaves.” Penelope Ody, 1993: 103.

“Rheumatism and many badly affected arthritic joints have been considerably improved by drinking dandelion tea regularly in place of ordinary tea at least three times daily.” William Smith, 1977: 66. [However, eliminating ordinary tea alone has also been seen to be beneficial. BC]

“A marvellous health drink which stimulates the liver, maintains resilient arteries, cleanses the blood and tones the nerves can be made by mixing equal parts of dandelion leaves and those of nettles and mistletoe.” Smith, as above.

 

 
Bel Charlesworth Medical Herbalist

Bel Charlesworth MNIMH
Medical Herbalist

BSc Herbal Medicine

Member of the National Institute of Medical Herbalists since 2003

Tel: 07775 920079

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